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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This comprehensive education program will provide participants with tools and strategies to increase knowledge and compliance related to the use of ILE and alternate lipid formulations.

    Delivery of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) began in the 1980s with the successful transition of a patient in need of life-long nutrition support who was determined to have better quality of life than could be achieved in a medical facility. Since then, HPN has grown significantly, offering patients the opportunity to enjoy a return to a more active lifestyle and reduce exposure to antibiotic-resistant infectious organisms commonly found in hospital settings. In NHIA's Industry Data Report, home infusion providers note HPN as a continued important segment of their overall business. With the addition of various new ILE and the increase use of alternate lipid emulsion formulations, home infusion providers will benefit from continuing education related to the various ILE options, indications for use, compounding best practices, and care considerations for home-based patients. This comprehensive education program will provide participants with tools and strategies to increase knowledge and compliance related to the use of ILE and alternate lipid formulations.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Understand the pathogenesis of need for Parenteral Nutritional and the indications for injectable lipid emulsion (ILE) therapy.
    2. List the various options for injectable lipid emulsion products available in the US.
    3. Describe the administration and dosing of alternative injectable lipid emulsion formulations in the adult and pediatric patient populations.
    4. Review best practices in the compounding and administration of injectable lipid emulsions (ILE).


    Beth Kerbel, PharmD

    Lead Clinical Pharmacist

    New England Life Care

    Beth Kerbel, PharmD, is a Lead Clinical Pharmacist at New England Life Care, a not for profit home infusion pharmacy that services patients throughout Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts. She is a graduate of Northeastern University with a Doctor of Pharmacy degree and holds a BS in Comprehensive Science with a minor in Biology and Chemistry from Villanova University. Kerbel has almost 14 years of clinical experience in home infusion and specialty pharmacy and is a key member of the NELC Nutrition Support Team. She lives in Scarborough, Maine with her husband and two sons.

    No Disclosures to Report

    Meredith Wood-Masteka, MS, RD, LD, CNSC

    Regional Director Nutrition Support & Strategic Business Partnerships

    New England Life Care

    Meredith Wood-Masteka, MS, RD, LD, CNSC is the Regional Director of Nutrition Support and Strategic Business Partnerships at New England Life Care where she focuses on clinical nutrition operations and business development. She received her MS in Nutrition and Food Science from the University of Rhode Island and is Board-Certified in Nutrition Support. Woods-Masteka has been an Adjunct Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Southern Maine for the last 15 years where she teaches Human Nutrition to undergraduate and graduate students. She lives in Portland, Maine with her husband and two sons.

    No Disclosures to Report

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/18/2021

    There is no doubt that we have been through much in our industry these past few years. We have survived and must now migrate through this new normal with a new sales approach, but also with a new or renewed approach to Strategic Sales Planning.

    There is no doubt that we have been through much in our industry these past few years. We have survived and must now migrate through this new normal with a new sales approach, but also with a new or renewed approach to Strategic Sales Planning.

    One of my favorite quote is: “A Goal without a plan is nothing more than a wish”, Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

    We can no longer approach our future years in sales without a goal that is deeply rooted in a plan. We must take strategic planning seriously and be consistent in our methods for creating, executing and monitoring a Strategic Sales Plan.There are several processes to consider, we must find the one that is right for our business and team. Securing a 2022 Strategic Sales Plan now will enable our team and business to achieve increased referrals and market share.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Explore two strategic sales planning options for 2022.
    2. Understand the data from our sales history that will impact our future plan.
    3. Review how to execute a strategic planning process.

    Ty Bello

    CEO

    Team@Work

    Ty Bello is the CEO of Team@Work. He is a Registered Corporate Coach with the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches. Ty is a highly sought-after speaker and thought leader in the HME, CRT and Infusion Therapy Industry. Ty provides relevant and best in class information during his presentations and during his one on one coaching. Ty has over 30 years of HME, CRT, and Infusion Business Optimization Experience as a sales professional, leader, and coach. Ty coaches Owners, Leaders and Team Members and raises the bar in their performance and business metrics. Ty is here today to uplift, encourage and inspire us to our life’s calling.

    No Disclosures to Report

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS). This article provides a clinical overview for home infusion providers who come to treat these patients, who require life-long therapy.

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS). This article provides a clinical overview for home infusion providers who come to treat these patients, who require life-long therapy. The authors provide a disease overview, including onset and epidemiology, and explain the disease's 4 phenotypes (relapsing-remitting, secondary progressive, primary progressive, and progressive relapsing). The article also outlines the clinical presentation and diagnosis of MS as well review treatment for both exacerbations and long-term disease control. Finally, the authors provide an overview of disease-modifying therapies and associated information relevant to providers working on care teams for MS patients. 

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Present an overview of Multiple Sclerosis (MS), including onset and epidemiology.
    2. Develop a clinical understanding of the different phenotypes of MS.
    3. Identify a typical MS clinical presentation.
    4. Understand the criteria for diagnosing Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS) and Primary Progressive MS and phenotypes.

    Syeda Laila Alqadri, MD

    Medical Director

    KabaFusion

    Syeda Laila Alqadri, MD is the Medical Director of KabaFusion, a national home infusion specialty pharmacy. She was Chief Resident and completed her Neurology Residency from University of Missouri and specialized in Epilepsy and Neurosurgical Intraoperative Neuromonitoring from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is a multi-national award-winning clinical research scientist, the Massachusetts State Liaison for Neuromuscular Medicine, and currently sits on the National Home Infusion Foundation Board of Directors. 

    No Disclosures to Report

    Omer Merchant

    Intern

    Chaminade College Preparatory High School

    Omer Merchant is a senior at Chaminade College Preparatory High School and has completed a clinical research internship with Dr. Alqadri. He aspires to pursue medicine and specialize in orthopedic surgery.

    No Disclosures to Report

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/07/2021

    There is no doubt that we are entering a new normal for Home Infusion Sales. How can we prepare for the way sales may need to be conducted and then how can we thrive in this new environment?

    There is no doubt that we are entering a new normal for Home Infusion Sales. How can we prepare for the way sales may need to be conducted and then how can we thrive in this new environment?

    Together we will explore what the Sales Professional must be prepared to do in this new normal or be left behind and negatively impact the referral cycle. Also, we will explore how the referral community at large will use the recent Public Health Emergency to keep medical sales professionals at bay. We must transform how we prepare, structure, and engage in the sales call process in the new normal.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. We will offer solutions for raising the bar on our professional status.
    2. How to create a targeted and focused sales approach in the market.
    3. Understand the impact that both a CRM and market data can have on your sustained business growth.
  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This program provides an overview of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, or COVID-19 and its impact on the US population. It covers the current therapies under consideration for treatment of the virus as well as the clinical research available to support these treatments. The program also covers vaccine development and the US government’s Operation Warp Speed to fast track vaccine development and production.

    This program provides an overview of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, or COVID-19 and its impact on the US population. It covers the current therapies under consideration for treatment of the virus as well as the clinical research available to support these treatments. The program also covers vaccine development and the US government’s Operation Warp Speed to fast track vaccine development and production.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. List 5 key clinical manifestations of COVID-19 infection.
    2. List 3 therapies currently under investigation for treating COVID-19.
    3. Articulate the different mechanisms of action in the 3 types of vaccines currently in development under Operation Warp Speed.

    Ryan Garst, PharmD, RPh, CGP, MBA

    Sr Director Clinical Services

    NHIA

    Ryan Garst, PharmD, RPh, CGP, MBA, is the Senior Director Clinical Services at the National Home Infusion Association (NHIA). He is graduate of Ohio Northern University with a Doctor of Pharmacy degree and a 2016 graduate of Kent State University with a Masters in Busines Administration. Garst has nearly 20 years of clinical and operations leadership in long-term care and home infusion/specialty pharmacy. He served as Director for Advanced Infusion Services before joining Clinical Specialties, where he served as Corporate Director of Pharmacy over three locations servicing six states and over 2,500 patients. Since the organization's acquisition by Option Care in 2015, Garst served as Director of Pharmacy as well as the Pharmcy Transformation Lead, working with leadership and field teams on implementation of IT solutions to enhance work process efficiencies and provide superior clinical care to patients.

    No Disclosures to Report

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Refeeding Syndrome (RS) has historically been defined as a range of metabolic and electrolyte disturbances that occur after the reintroduction of calories after a period of minimal or no calorie intake.

    Refeeding Syndrome (RS) has historically been defined as a range of metabolic and electrolyte disturbances that occur after the reintroduction of calories after a period of minimal or no calorie intake. This continuing education article will review RS from its history and pathophysiology to the recent ASPEN 2020 Consensus Recommendations which have redefined RS, established criteria for identifying at risk patients, and updated recommendations for prevention and treatment of patients at RS risk focusing on the adult patient.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Define and describe the pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome.
    2. Describe signs and symptoms of refeeding syndrome.
    3. List criteria included in ASPEN's 2020 adult refeeding syndrome risk assessment.
    4. Describe steps to prevent refeeding syndrome in at risk adult patients.

    Lisa Kinder, RD, CNSC

    West Region Nutrition Support Dietitian

    Optum Infusion Pharmacy

    Lisa Kinder RD, CNSC, is the West Region Nutrition Support Dietitian at Optum Infusion Pharmacy. She has been a registered dietitian for 19 years; has worked exclusively in the home infusion setting caring for parenteral nutrition patients for 16 years; and has maintained certification as a nutrition support clinician for over 15 years. Kinder has co-authored and presented several posters at ASPEN and NHIA and was a podium presenter at NHIA’s annual conference in 2017. She was honored with a Sages of Clinical Service Award from United Health Group in 2019.  

    No Disclosures to Report

    Shirley Au, RD, CNSC

    West Regional Nutrition Support Dietitian

    Optum Infusion Pharmacy

    Shirley Au, RD CNSC is the West Regional Nutrition Support Dietitian at Optum Infusion Pharmacy. She has extensive experience in home infusion, specializing in nutrition support business development and patient care management. She began her home infusion career in 2004 and has held leadership positions with several national providers. Au has published several journal articles and presented posters at ASPEN's annual conference. She has also been honored by her peers as a Dietitian Top Performer, Clinician of the Year, and Everyday Hero. 

    No Disclosures to Report

    Penny Allen, RD, CNSC

    National Director Nutrition Support

    Optum Infusion Pharmacy

    Penny Allen RD, CNSC, is the National Director of Nutrition Support for Optum Infusion Pharmacy, formerly known as BriovaRx Infusion. She has been in the HPN/home infusion industry for over 30 years, starting her nutrition career in Boston. Allen is a Certified Nutrition Support Clinician (CNSC), serves as Chair of the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Public Policy Committee, and is a published subject matter expert in Medicare PN policy and other PN-related clinical topics.

    No Disclosures to Report

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    On June 1, the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) released the long-awaited final revisions to General Chapters Pharmaceutical Compounding - Sterile Preparations, and Pharmaceutical Compounding - Nonsterile Preparations. USP also released a newly developed Chapter regarding the preparation, compounding, dispensing, and repackaging of radiopharmaceuticals.

    On June 1, the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) released the long-awaited final revisions to General Chapters <797> Pharmaceutical Compounding - Sterile Preparations, and <795> Pharmaceutical Compounding - Nonsterile Preparations. USP also released a newly developed Chapter <825> regarding the preparation, compounding, dispensing, and repackaging of radiopharmaceuticals. 

    While standards are living documents subject to further modification, this release aligned several chapters, including Chapter <800> - Hazardous Drugs—Handling in Health Care Settings, with an effective date of December 1, 2019. To reach this point, the USP Compounding Expert Committee reviewed over 8,000 comments in a revision process that spanned a multi-year timeframe and included two draft revisions to solicit input from a wide range of stakeholders.

    Meeting or exceeding USP <797>—it is designed to be a minimum standard—is a key component in ensuring patient safety and a significant step toward compliance with state and federal regulations, accreditation standards, and other requirements for legal and ethical pharmacy operations. All providers are strongly encouraged to download and familiarize themselves with the standards. This article will summarize the major changes between the current standard and the final revision and explain how and when to apply the standards in Chapter <797> when preparing compounded sterile products (CSPs) used in home infusion and other alternate infusion settings. Compounding personnel and persons who are responsible for the operation of a compounding facility are highly encouraged to read the chapter in its entirety as this article does not capture every aspect of the standard, rather it focuses on areas most applicable to home infusion.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Summarize the major changes between the current standard and the final revision to Chapter <797> Pharmaceutical Compounding Sterile Preparations.
    2. Explain how and when to apply the standards in Chapter <797> whe preparing compounded sterile products used in home infusion and other alternate infusion settings.
    3. Discuss the implementation timeframe and method of enforcement for USP general chapters <797> and <800>.

    Connie Sullivan

    President & CEO

    National Home Infusion Association

    Connie Sullivan, BSPharm, is the President and CEO of NHIA. Prior to joining the NHIA staff, Sullivan was a practicing home infusion pharmacist and National Infusion Director for HCR ManorCare for 15 years. She is the Vice Chair of USP’s Sterile Compounding Expert Committee and USP’s Parenteral Nutrition Safety Expert Panel.

    No Disclosures to Report

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/25/2021

    Over the past several months the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for casirivimab and imdevimab (REGEN-COV) has been revised to expand the indications, routes of administration, and criteria for eligibility for treatment for COVID-19. This webinar will review the current EUA for REGEN-COV and provide an update on billing guidance for home infusion professionals.

    Over the past several months the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for casirivimab and imdevimab (REGEN-COV) has been revised to expand the indications, routes of administration, and criteria for eligibility for treatment for COVID-19. This webinar will review the current EUA for REGEN-COV and provide an update on billing guidance for home infusion professionals.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Overview of the current state of COVID-19 in the US
    2. Review recent updates to the REGEN-CoV EUA
    3. Review billing for COVID-19 monoclonal antibodies

    Dr Jeffrey M Joseph

    Associate Director, Field Medical Affairs

    Regeneron

    Jeffrey Joseph, MD joined Regeneron Pharmaceuticals in March 2021 as an Associate Medical Director, Medical Affairs on the COVID-19 team, part of the General Medicine Franchise to support TN, NC, SC, and VA. Dr. Joseph has been a key contributor in helping to expand access to REGEN-COV throughout the region with the ambition of increasing patient access >span class="NormalTextRun SCXW27500930 BCX0">primary care reach which could drastically impact the course of the pandemic. Dr. Joseph has been in industry for 11 years. Prior roles included positions as Medical Science Liaison with DBV Technologies for NY Metro and Regional Medical Liaison with Novo Nordisk, Inc. for upstate NY. Upon embarking on an industry-focused career after medical training, Dr. Joseph previously spent several years supporting pharmaceutical Medical Affairs and marketing clients as a Medical Director in the medical communications space in New York City. His therapeutic focus, while diverse, has focused in the cardiometabolic and type two diabetes arena, immunology and food allergy, and now infectious disease. Dr. Joseph also has experience in organ and tissue donation having served in the procurement of human tissue for donation during and after medical school with the New York Organ Donor Network, now called LiveOnNY. Jeff holds a Doctor of Medicine degree from Ross University School of Medicine and a Bachelor of Science in biology and sports science from Tulane University in New Orleans.

    No Disclosures to Report

    Bill Noyes

    Sr VP of Reimbursement Policy

    NHIA

    Bill Noyes is the Senior Vice President of Reimbursement Policy at the National Home Infusion Association (NHIA). He joined NHIA in 2012 as Vice President of Health Information Policy, focusing on reimbursement and regulatory issues affecting providers' ability to do business and collect payment for their services. Noyes sits on four Medicare Contractor Advisory Councils and is the liaison to NHIA's reimbursement-focused committees. He also works closely with the NHIA government relations team to gain more meaningful Medicare coverage for home infusion. He served as Interim CEO of the associaiton from July 2018 to November 2018. Prior to joining NHIA, Noyes spent 20 years as Vice President of Operations for a multi-state home infusion provider where he was responsible for purchasing, distribution, facilities, revenue cycle management, and pharmacy operations.

    No Disclosures to Report

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/22/2021

    The presenters will provide home IV catheter occlusion case studies and review new research from a home infusion company on how reducing preventable complications created a more remarkable patient experience.

    The incidence of catheter occlusion in home infusion patients is 28% resulting in delays of treatment, increased nursing encounters and emergency room visits, with higher overall pharmacy costs from supplies and alteplase used to declot catheters. The presenters will provide home IV catheter occlusion case studies and review new research from a home infusion company on how reducing preventable complications created a more remarkable patient experience.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to define the pathogenesis, risks factors, and mitigants for preventing intraluminal thrombotic occlusions.
    2. Participants will have examples of various case studies for how occlusions effect home infusion patients.
    3. Participants will recognize the new 2021 Infusion Nurses Society Standards of Practice approach to evidence and needleless connectors.
    4. Particpants will evaluate a before and after 18-month cohort study of a single home infusion intervention comparing occlusion outcomes of two types of needleless connectors in preventing catheter occlusions.


    Lisa Gorski

    Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Ascension at Home WI

    Lisa Gorski has worked for over 35 years as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS)/Clinical Educator for Ascension at Home Wisconsin (Formerly Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice) providing infusion-related education as well as direct patient care. She is the author of several books and over 70 journal articles/book chapters on infusion therapy and home care related topics. She is past- president of the Infusion Nursing Society (INS), and has chaired the 2011, 2016, and 2021 INS Standards of Practice committee. In 2006, she was inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing. In 2011, she was named the CNS of the Year by NACNS. She speaks nationally and internationally on standards development, infusion/vascular access, and home health care.

    No Disclosures to Report

    Bob Buzas

    Director of Pharmacy Operations

    Allegheny Health Network

    Bob Buzas is a Registered Pharmacist and the Director of Pharmacy Operations for Allegheny Health Network Home Infusion in Pittsburgh, PA.

    No Disclosures to Report

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In the mid- to late-1990s, interest in appropriate dosing of vancomycin increased due to a number of factors, including: 1) dramatic rise in rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) throughout United States hospitals, 2) reported strains of MRSA intermediate and resistant to VAN, 3) development of new gram-positive agents, and 4) increased clinical failure with VAN and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) creep among MRSA isolates.

    In the mid- to late-1990s, interest in appropriate dosing of vancomycin increased due to a number of factors, including: 1) dramatic rise in rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) throughout United States hospitals, 2) reported strains of MRSA intermediate and resistant to VAN, 3) development of new gram-positive agents, and 4) increased clinical failure with VAN and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) creep among MRSA isolates. Recently, several researchers have determined that the preferred pharmacodynamic parameter to decrease bacterial burden is actually a ratio of 24-hour area under the curve to minimum inhibitory cncetration (MIC), or AUC24/MIC. This article explores important aspects of AUC dosing, including methods to measure AUC, and AUC in home infusion. It includes case studies for further elaboration.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Review the history of vancomycin AUC/MIC pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics concepts along with current guidelines for use.
    2. Describe the relationship between vancomycin trough levels, AUC/MIC ratio and vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity.
    3. Review the different methods used to calculate vancomycin AUC/MIC.
    4. Discuss the role and application of AUC/MIC monitoring in home infusion along with the transition from the inpatient setting.

    Anne R Daniels, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP

    Froedtert Hospital

    Anne R Daniels, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP graduated from the University of Minnesota School of Pharmacy, and then completed her pharmacy residency at Froedtert Hospital. She has practiced in critical care, internal medicine, and infectious diseases over the last 20 years. She currently provides care for patients in the Froedtert Infectious Diseases clinic and is a member of the Froedtert Antimicrobial Stewardship Program. She has served as a mentor and preceptor for numerous pharmacy students and residents. Her practice interests include treatment and adherence opportunities for people living with HIV, HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy, and immunizations.

    No Disclosures to Report

    Diane M Marks, BCPharm, BCPS

    Pharmacist

    Froedtert Hospital

    Diane M. Marks, BSPharm BCPS, graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of pharmacy then completed her residency at Doyne Hospital, now Froedtert Hospital. Most of her career has been spent working inpatient hospital pharmacy with focus on critical care, emergency medicine, cardiology, surgery, and medicine. She also has experience in retail pharmacy, anticoagulation clinic and transitions of care. Throughout this time, she had the opportunity to precept and mentor pharmacy students and residents. Four years ago, she made a career change and began working home infusion; a new service line within the Froedtert health system. She is now the Home Infusion Coordinator in this rapidly growing department and a Clinical Affiliate Instructor for the Medical College of Wisconsin School of Pharmacy.

    No Disclosures to Report